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I had my 1st evic trouble code this weekend just after going thru a carwash. My 3rd (high-mount) brake light bulb got fried as a result of a poor seal of the brake light/cargo light. I replaced the bulb. Now, how do I clear the trouble code indication off the dash display?
 

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I had my 1st evic trouble code this weekend just after going thru a carwash. My 3rd (high-mount) brake light bulb got fried as a result of a poor seal of the brake light/cargo light. I replaced the bulb. Now, how do I clear the trouble code indication off the dash display?
I'm not sure of the new trucks, but my old faithful way to reset them without going to the dealer was to disconnect the positive terminal on the battery, wait 10 seconds and then hook it back up. Give it a whirl, you can't hurt anything.
 

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I would disconnect the negitive terminal for safty reasons.... If you are holding the pos, and touch the truck (any part thats grounded) you will get shocked
 

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I had my 1st evic trouble code this weekend just after going thru a carwash. My 3rd (high-mount) brake light bulb got fried as a result of a poor seal of the brake light/cargo light. I replaced the bulb. Now, how do I clear the trouble code indication off the dash display?
The trouble code should go away after you put in a new bulb. If not you may want to invest in an inexpensive OBD2 reader. They will tell you the code number if you have one and let you reset or remove the code if one gets set. if you have a real problem the code will just come back. This will save you from the batter reset that forces you to reset everything in the truck after.
 

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Just to update everyone, I went to the auto parts store & bought another bulb & replaced the 2nd bulb - no more trouble code! I guess the lighting system is REALLY picky about bulbs!
 

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Go hold the pos terminal and then touch the frame of the truck . Report back your findings..
I didn't feel anything. Here is why...

1. It is current passing through tissue that causes pain, not the voltage.

2. The DC current threshold for pain is about 5mA.

3. Skin resistance is what determines the current for a given voltage. In this case 12VDC.

4. Skin resistance is not constant and can vary from ~1K ohms to several
100K ohms. Usually dry non-abraded skin is in the range of ~50K ohms to ~100K ohms and higher. Sweaty hands can be lower.

5. The current that will flow with 12V and 50K ohms is I=12V/50K=0.2mA and that is ~1/20th the threshold for pain.

7. The bottom line is that unless your hands have low resistance, <5K ohms, no pain will be felt. If you have an open cut or sore on your fingers you probably will. If you have wet hands, you may feel pain. If you have felt a shock from 12VDC, then you have unusually low resistance skin, which is not normal.

Working as an engineer in a lab, for 38 years, we considered 50VDC to be the threshold for getting more than a tingle and had to guard any exposed voltages greater than that. From OSHA - "live parts of electric equipment operating at 50 volts or more shall be guarded against accidental contact".

Lastly, have you ever seen a warning sign under the hood of a vehicle that says Warning Shock Hazard?
 

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Just add to what Anomoly said, his calculations are actually double what they should be since the current has to travel through two layers of skin, once at the positive terminal and again at the negative terminal. Bottom line, you could stick your tongue to one terminal and hold your finger on the other and not get shocked. Lead poisoning maybe, but no risk of electrocution. This is coming from a second expert in the field matty, with a master's in EE.
 

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No i havent. but iv been shocked before


Good catch ED_Lover! Actually, I just used a off the top of my head number for total skin resistance and figured no one would call me out for references.


If mattyj want's to see what a shock really feels like, try touching a spark plug wire while the engine is running. We used to do that for fun...
 

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I didn't feel anything. Here is why...

1. It is current passing through tissue that causes pain, not the voltage.

2. The DC current threshold for pain is about 5mA.

3. Skin resistance is what determines the current for a given voltage. In this case 12VDC.

4. Skin resistance is not constant and can vary from ~1K ohms to several
100K ohms. Usually dry non-abraded skin is in the range of ~50K ohms to ~100K ohms and higher. Sweaty hands can be lower.

5. The current that will flow with 12V and 50K ohms is I=12V/50K=0.2mA and that is ~1/20th the threshold for pain.

7. The bottom line is that unless your hands have low resistance, <5K ohms, no pain will be felt. If you have an open cut or sore on your fingers you probably will. If you have wet hands, you may feel pain. If you have felt a shock from 12VDC, then you have unusually low resistance skin, which is not normal.

Working as an engineer in a lab, for 38 years, we considered 50VDC to be the threshold for getting more than a tingle and had to guard any exposed voltages greater than that. From OSHA - "live parts of electric equipment operating at 50 volts or more shall be guarded against accidental contact".

Lastly, have you ever seen a warning sign under the hood of a vehicle that says Warning Shock Hazard?
Dude, you killed that one dead.
 

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Good catch ED_Lover! Actually, I just used a off the top of my head number for total skin resistance and figured no one would call me out for references.


If mattyj want's to see what a shock really feels like, try touching a spark plug wire while the engine is running. We used to do that for fun...
Yea iv done that on my bike to check the wires...
 
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