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In other words, can I just go down the street and by the cheapest diesel fuel at my nearest cheapest gas station? Or is it like gasoline where each company has formulations like Shell has 'V-Power' and Chevron has 'Techron'?
 

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You been reading too many paid advertisements.


Most always that "magic juju" advertised to be in the bottle or gas or diesel is hokum to take your money and give you nothing but a placebo. It's all a sucker pitch.


Used to buy gas from a station we called "Art's Panther Pixx". Found out he bought his gas from the same wholesalers that sold to multiple other stations with different brands. Way cheaper and the same stuff.


There are only so many refineries. Companies use the same ones to get product to their operations. Then they hype and market it to make the most profit possible from our huge masses of uninformed.


Buy what you want. It's all coming from the same place.
 

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There is a massive network of underground pipes that all refineries use collectively to transfer product to terminals across the nation. All refineries are mandated to meet stringent standards without deviation. When tankers are loaded at the terminals, brand specific additives are then mixed with the fuel. While gas headed to the shell station will have their branded platformate formula additive, the gas itself is identical to the gas routed to joe blow's corner service station & may actually have been refined at an Exxon, BP, or who knows what refinery. The same applies to diesel production & delivery; the only difference will be the possibility of brand specific additives.
 

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I was wondering about fuel quality from station to station as I am guilty of listening to the "additive advertisements" when it came to gasoline for my car. Now I have a diesel and my local gas stations do not seem to talk up the diesel products.
A gentleman I work with tried to explain "winter" diesel vs "summer" diesel and said there is a difference to quality during winter months when they "blend" the fuel with another energy source to make it useable in the winter. The energy source he believes that is blended into the fuel in N.B. Canada is kerosene, which is to avoid gelling or to achieve a lower clouding point. Anyone have any local/brand information on what other Fuel providers use in their "blended" fuel? (The cashiers at the fuel providers are unable to answer my questions)
- Like I said before, this is my first diesel, still trying learn as much as possible.
 

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The only point of differentiation between the stations would be the tanks themselves IMO and how long the fuel has been in the tank. Minimal discrepancies, but if you see the tanker there keep on moving, you don't want the guck in your truck that gets tossed up from refilling the storage tanks.
 

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I have seen signs that say truck Diesel and Car Diesel. not sure the difference though
Hmmmm, not sure but if I drove a VW diesel don't believe I'd pull into the lane where Kenwworths fuels up and vice versa. Fuel is all the same as far as I know except for down in Baja California, Mexico. They don't have ultra low sulphur and sells for equivalent of $2.50 per u.s.gallon.

David
San Diego
 

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I have seen signs that say truck Diesel and Car Diesel. not sure the difference though
I saw this as well, I asked the folks behind the counter and they could tell me it is the same fuel, just a different size nozzel.
 

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You are getting good answers. As for the "blend" or winter fuel, there are additives, kerosene is one, that drops the gelling temperature point. Think some places call a mostly kerosene product #1 diesel.


Normally you will not get as good a fuel mileage using a bit more kerosene in the fuel. When I lived in the frozen north I would add an anti-gel component to my fuel as a regular practice.
 

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You are getting good answers. As for the "blend" or winter fuel, there are additives, kerosene is one, that drops the gelling temperature point. Think some places call a mostly kerosene product [URL=http://www.dieselramforum.com/forum/usertag.php?do=list&action=hash&hash=1]#1 [/URL] diesel.


Normally you will not get as good a fuel mileage using a bit more kerosene in the fuel. When I lived in the frozen north I would add an anti-gel component to my fuel as a regular practice.
You're right on the money, cap. Winter blend, or #1 diesel, is simply an addition of kerosene at the bulk terminal or, in rarer cases, actually at the station. Winter blend should not be confused with winterized #2 diesel which actually has some rather complex additives dumped in the tanker @ the terminals. These vary by chemical make up & amount in different geographical areas. While diesel fuel actually has more additives than gas (primarily due to the short comings of the ulsd formulation), they seem to be relatively standard & none brand specific. One thing that I found incredibly amazing is the fact that only 1 of our 34 refineries are able to meet all 5 quality standard categories. Our government seems to be setting lofty goals & then make allowances for the shortcomings of the nations antiquated refinery system!!
 
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