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Finally Nissan has made their move on going diesel, hopefully toyota does too.

I know tundra owners are begging toyota to come out with a diesel.
 

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Japanese-made pickup trucks just don't feel right to me. The pick-up truck is an American icon and I don't believe that foreign companies "get it". They will never ever catch up to American truck makers.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thailand

As the world's second largest manufacturer of pickup trucks, aided by punitive excise taxes on passenger cars, pickup trucks have long been extremely popular in Thailand: between 1987 and 1996, 58 percent of all cars sold in the country were pickup trucks.
Pickups are used extensively for shipping and transport, notably the converted songthaew (lit. "two-row") minibus that forms the backbone of public transportation in and between many smaller cities.


Thailand is also the world's second largest market for pickup trucks, after the United States; 490,000 pickups were sold there in 2005. During 2011, despite the industry suffering from earthquake and tsunami in Japan and later followed by widespread severe flooding in Thailand, a total of 893,988 pickup trucks were manufactured in Thailand while domestic sales reached 328,219 units. Sales of the one-ton pickup trucks during the same year commanded 42% of the total market share. Toyota was the top pickup truck seller, having sold 121,888 units of the Hilux Vigo, followed by the Isuzu D-Max with 113,884 units in second place and Mitsubishi Triton in third place with 40,523 units.


Pickup truck - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Our trucks are big, clumsy and are able to tow and push alot of weight. But are not suited for roads that were designed first for carts and later modified to fit cars. If you want a utility vehicle that can maneuver, these small size trucks can go places our trucks would be squeamish about.

Just look at the Toyota hilux, or the Ford global ranger...trucks that the big 3 don't want to sell here because it would cut into their big truck sales.

I for one think its time to challenge what people think a truck can be and how big they need to be to get the job done.
 

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No clue how that Thailand comment is related. Thailand is a drug-infested, immoral, POS, backward place. No reasonable American would get near that mess or use it as a standard for anything reasonable.

Sad to see Chrysler did not want that smaller Cummins for the Cherokee or Wrangler. Unless it's a bit rough and loud, the engine size would seem to be a good fit for something smaller than a full-sized 1/2 ton pickup. Guess they have to sell their products for profit with no sense of pride in America.

If something like this does eventually go into production and sale, people here will buy it with little understanding of American history.

Thanks for the video links. It's good to know what's going on.
 

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No clue how that Thailand comment is related. Thailand is a drug-infested, immoral, POS, backward place. No reasonable American would get near that mess or use it as a standard for anything reasonable.
I think he was stating that there is a need for a small Japanese made pickup, only in other parts of the world. Thailand seems to be a big market, and China is going to be a bigger automotive market than all of north america soon.

Sad to see Chrysler did not want that smaller Cummins for the Cherokee or Wrangler. Unless it's a bit rough and loud, the engine size would seem to be a good fit for something smaller than a full-sized 1/2 ton pickup. Guess they have to sell their products for profit with no sense of pride in America.

If something like this does eventually go into production and sale, people here will buy it with little understanding of American history.

Thanks for the video links. It's good to know what's going on.
I read that they couldn't get the fuel economy that they wanted. They already have a big noisy capable diesel, they wanted a refined, quiet, super fuel efficient one for the the 1500 and the V Motori fit the requirements better.
 

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I think there will always be a demand, they just have to play their cards right in making it all work well for them and the consumer.
 

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That is interesting now. Guess I mis-read the Thailand connection. Sorry.

Did pick up that there is no current start to production for sale. Also heard in that video one of them talk of the noise outside but how quiet it was inside.

Not sure if the engine was a 4 or 6 cylinder and if it was in-line. Knew Cummins had a V-8, 5 liter diesel running around. That's what I thought they were going to use. That's a bit big and heavy for a 1/2 ton and probably better suited for 3/4 ton trucks.

As for the 2.8 liter, no matter the configuration, I think it would be too small for a full-sized 1/2 ton, especially if towing was in the mix. Bet it would have great fuel mileage.

Another issue is emissions. Will it be set up as we have with the DPF and DEF systems or will that be modified as GM does with the Duramax and still keep that system,. Some diesel cards do not even have to use the DEF system. That would be nice.
 

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Thailand

As the world's second largest manufacturer of pickup trucks, aided by punitive excise taxes on passenger cars, pickup trucks have long been extremely popular in Thailand: between 1987 and 1996, 58 percent of all cars sold in the country were pickup trucks.
Pickups are used extensively for shipping and transport, notably the converted songthaew (lit. "two-row") minibus that forms the backbone of public transportation in and between many smaller cities.


Thailand is also the world's second largest market for pickup trucks, after the United States; 490,000 pickups were sold there in 2005. During 2011, despite the industry suffering from earthquake and tsunami in Japan and later followed by widespread severe flooding in Thailand, a total of 893,988 pickup trucks were manufactured in Thailand while domestic sales reached 328,219 units. Sales of the one-ton pickup trucks during the same year commanded 42% of the total market share. Toyota was the top pickup truck seller, having sold 121,888 units of the Hilux Vigo, followed by the Isuzu D-Max with 113,884 units in second place and Mitsubishi Triton in third place with 40,523 units.


Pickup truck - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Our trucks are big, clumsy and are able to tow and push alot of weight. But are not suited for roads that were designed first for carts and later modified to fit cars. If you want a utility vehicle that can maneuver, these small size trucks can go places our trucks would be squeamish about.

Just look at the Toyota hilux, or the Ford global ranger...trucks that the big 3 don't want to sell here because it would cut into their big truck sales.

I for one think its time to challenge what people think a truck can be and how big they need to be to get the job done.

I would love a HiLux. I will settle for an ecodiesel. :)
 

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The Engine was rejected by RAM on the basis of Fuel efficiency, does Nissan really think this is going to work? They have no differentiator now, ok hands down they will have most in class torque...

For decades, Cummins engines have been exclusive to Ram pickups, but the diesel engine that Cummins produced for the 1500 was completely shot down by Ram. Apparently the automaker was looking for a highway fuel economy rating of no less than 26 mpg, and the Cummins Diesel was only able to return around 24. So, for the first time ever, Cummins was forced to find another buyer—and Nissan jumped on the chance to take the engine off their hands.
 

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Video didn't reveal much information nor provide much in the way of driving impressions. Essentially just restated what was already in the press. Its a diesel in a Frontier. No specifics on fuel economy, towing capacity or price.
 

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Why buy half a truck

I've owned Nissan and Toyota trucks. I've also owned a Ford Ranger and Bronco II in its time.
The question I asked myself for years was "Why buy half a truck?" More than once over the years, I wished I had a full size truck.
I had a new 3/4 ton GMC Sierra Grande in 1976 and loved the truck, hated the ride and hated the gas mileage. Eight miles per gallon just didn't cut it for me. That's when I went to the small trucks.
In 2010, I bought my first Hemi. In 2012 I bought a Longhorn Hemi. Almost four months ago, I bought the ED.
Why buy half a truck when the best of all worlds is here now? I love my EcoDiesel. My two year cycle of turning in trucks is over. This one is here to stay.
 

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I've owned Nissan and Toyota trucks. I've also owned a Ford Ranger and Bronco II in its time.
The question I asked myself for years was "Why buy half a truck?"
Especially when the real reason you consider a small truck is to reduce costs. The small trucks cost the same to buy, maintain, and fuel as a 1500. The only real reason is the actual physical size of the thing. If you need to fit into small parking spaces and it is capable for your needs then it makes sense.
 

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I've owned Nissan and Toyota trucks. I've also owned a Ford Ranger and Bronco II in its time.
The question I asked myself for years was "Why buy half a truck?" More than once over the years, I wished I had a full size truck.
I had a new 3/4 ton GMC Sierra Grande in 1976 and loved the truck, hated the ride and hated the gas mileage. Eight miles per gallon just didn't cut it for me. That's when I went to the small trucks.
In 2010, I bought my first Hemi. In 2012 I bought a Longhorn Hemi. Almost four months ago, I bought the ED.
Why buy half a truck when the best of all worlds is here now? I love my EcoDiesel. My two year cycle of turning in trucks is over. This one is here to stay.

I have heard many others say the same that have came from a history of owning a wide range of trucks. At least you also come from a wide range of trucks.
 

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Especially when the real reason you consider a small truck is to reduce costs. The small trucks cost the same to buy, maintain, and fuel as a 1500. The only real reason is the actual physical size of the thing. If you need to fit into small parking spaces and it is capable for your needs then it makes sense.
depends on what we're talking about, my Ranger FX4 has a TINY footprint compared to the F150 and my fuel costs are much less than a full size gasser...

I can parallel park it downtown and still load it with dry wall...
 

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depends on what we're talking about, my Ranger FX4 has a TINY footprint compared to the F150 and my fuel costs are much less than a full size gasser...

I can parallel park it downtown and still load it with dry wall...
How does the FX4 compare with an EcoDiesel on mpg? I can park my Bighorn Crewcab downtown too and put 1400 lbs of cement in it without dragging the bumper on the ground. I can also put 5 adults into it in comfort. Can the FX4 do that?
 

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How does the FX4 compare with an EcoDiesel on mpg? I can park my Bighorn Crewcab downtown too and put 1400 lbs of cement in it without dragging the bumper on the ground. I can also put 5 adults into it in comfort. Can the FX4 do that?
Different strokes for different folks people. In the city you might want the versatility of a truck but not its size, that is where the ranger and frontier trucks tend to shine. Also those small trucks work well with narrow roads and dont tend to get high-centered as easily.
 

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By the way, since this thread is on a japanese truck, what about Toyota? Does anyone have any idea when they will step into the ring with say a.... Tundra Diesel?
 
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